Expert Answers

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Birth Control

“I just started using the ring as my primary form of contraception. I took my old ring out in preparation for the new one in a week, and my period started 3 days later. It was almost over by the time I put the new one in. How does the ring completely prevent ovulation if you don’t put it in on your period and the ring-free week has no hormones?”

The easy answer is that the ring, like other birth control products, tricks the body into thinking that it is pregnant. This “trickery” occurs when the hormones in the ring (progestin and estrogen) are absorbed into the bloodstream from the walls of the vagina and keeps the ovaries from releasing eggs. The hormones also cause the cervical mucus to thicken, which keeps sperm from meeting with and fertilizing an egg. When the ring is removed, the body thinks that an egg was not fertilized and sheds the lining of the uterus. And so the cycle begins again with the reinsertion of a ring.

“My boyfriend and I were messing around and ended up grinding against each other in our underwear. Could pre-cum get through the fabric and get me pregnant? I’m a virgin and slightly paranoid about pregnancy.“

To answer your question, you are not likely to get pregnant from the activities that you are describing. The more important conversation is how old are you and your boyfriend and have you talked about using birth control. I want to encourage you to make an appointment with a health care provider who can give you information on birth control and can also provide information on protection from sexually transmitted infections.

“I was giving my boyfriend a hand job and this watery stuff seeped out of his penis every now and then. Apparently it got on my arm and he thought it was spit, so he wiped it off. After that he started fingering me. I googled whether I could get pregnant from this since his hands may have touched it, but I can’t get a straight answer. What do you guys say?“

It is highly unlikely that you will become pregnant from the situation you describe. However, you should see a health care provider to discuss birth control options to prevent an unintended pregnancy.

 

We hope this helps!

“Will drinking affect my birth control?”

Great question! Let’s break this down:

  • Alcohol won’t affect the way the IUD, implant, ring or patch works.
  • Alcohol doesn’t change the effectiveness of the shot.
  • Alcohol will only affect the pill if you throw it up because of drinking, or you drink so much that you forget to take it. (Drinking that much alcohol can be dangerous, so please be careful and be smart.)

Even though alcohol doesn’t mess with your birth control, mixing alcohol and sexual activities can be dangerous. Alcohol can cloud your judgment and make you do things you normally wouldn’t do sober (consent = a must). It can also make you forget to use a condom (or use one incorrectly), which can leave you susceptible to STIs and unplanned pregnancy.

“I have a friend who isn’t on any birth control. She and her boyfriend have recently been having a lot of unprotected sex. She recently has been having a lot of trouble eating things such as bread and milk because they give her an upset stomach. Can an early pregnancy cause symptoms like that?“

Early pregnancy can indeed cause a change in women’s diet. Some women find foods intolerable, may crave other foods, or may experience nausea / vomiting. Encourage your friend to see her health care provider.

 

We hope this helps!

“I have been bleeding for two months and I’m 25 years old. I have the Implanon and my three years of having it was in 2013 but I never had it removed. Do you think that’s why I can’t stop bleeding?”

According to the research on Nexplanon (the newer version of Implanon) the bleeding you are describing would not be related to a contraceptive device that was implanted in 2010 and “expired” in 2013. You
should see a care provider who will be able to evaluate why you are having bleeding for two months and will also be able to remove the Nexplanon for you.

We hope this helps!

“I took the Depo shot four weeks ago and have been experiencing vaginal dryness and pain during sex.  In the first week,  I was getting headaches but they disappeared – does that mean the pain will disappear as well? If not, is there anything I can do to stop it??

The pain you are having with sex may be because of the vaginal dryness. There are several lubricants on the market that can be used, such as KY or Astro-glide. These are water soluble and can be used with Latex condoms. Remember, products made with petroleum jelly, such as Vaseline, should never be used as a lubricant. If the extra lubrication does not relieve the painful sex, you should see a care provider.

We hope this helps!

“I’m have The Mirena. Does he still have to wear a condom?”

Contraceptive methods, such as Mirena, do not protect against sexually transmitted infections. If you are absolutely certain that both of you are monogamous in your relationship, then you might consider not using condoms. However, if you or your partner ever engage in a casual relationship, then condom
use is needed.

We hope this helps!

“Could I get a prescription for birth control as easily as walking into a clinic and asking for one?”

In most states, the answer to your question would be yes. The federal law allows for women to seek services for family planning and testing for sexually transmitted infections if they are 13 years or older. In most states, the state law will follow the federal law.

The problem for young women is that if they do not want their parents to know that they are sexually active, your insurance will send home an explanation of benefits (EOB) that will tell the parent(s)
that their daughter was seen in the clinic but will not tell the parents what the visit was for. The parent(s) may ask their child why they went to clinic so, if there is not good communication between the adults and the child, things could get messy!

You want to find a clinic that is youth friendly. The website Advocates for Youth has lots of information about teen rights and youth friendly services.

https://www.advocatesforyouth.org/

We hope this helps!

“I saw a video of a girl that got a lot of pimples because of birth control. Is this common? How do I make sure this doesn’t happen to me?”

Most birth control pills help protect against pimples. I wouldn’t let a few pimples stop me from protecting myself against an unintended pregnancy.

We hope this helps!

“How effective is preventing pregnancy if you take the pill every day at the same time and he wears a condom?”

Using the birth control pill with a condom is very
effective at preventing an unintended pregnancy. Nothing is 100% effective
except for abstinence.

We hope this helps!

“A year ago I was put on depo but only went for two shots. I went 6 months without a shot and finally started bleeding again. Since I was sexually active again I went the week after my period to get my shots renewed. I got the shot and had unprotected sex a month after. I started bleeding but I thought it was just because I wasn’t used to it anymore. I stopped bleeding for a week and now I have been bleeding for a month straight. I also have a moving sensation in my stomach.. Please help!”

A major side effect of Depo Provera is irregular bleeding. You need to see your health care provider for a pregnancy test and pending results, your provider can provide the needed care.
Make an appointment by finding a clinic near you: www.factnotfiction.com/clinic-finder

“I have the dermal birth control implant and I have had it for one year. I recently had sex and he pulled out.  I took four tests: 1st was negative, 2nd was negative until five hours later, 3rd and 4th were negative. Could I be pregnant? Do I need to take another test in a few days?”

The birth control implant provides protection from pregnancy for 3 years. Since you have had your implant for a year, you should be protected from pregnancy. It sounds like the second pregnancy test was a false-positive.

Remember, the implant does not protect against a sexually transmitted infection so latex condoms should be used if you are ever unsure about your partner.

 

Hope this helps.

“Can I still have a full period and be pregnant?”

Although it’s not common for someone to be pregnant and have a “full” period, there are some women who do have a light period or vaginal spotting the first 2 or 3 months after becoming pregnant, as the womb (uterus) adjusts to the hormones of pregnancy.  Even with a full period, if you think you might be pregnant, you should go to your health care provider or local clinic and get a pregnancy test done right away.

 

“I had sex, but then the next day my period came. Could I be pregnant?”

You are not pregnant if you are having a normal menstrual cycle. The bigger question is do you want to become pregnant? If the answer is ‘no’, then seek the counsel of your care provider to discuss your birth control options.

 

“My boyfriend and I had sex on the 3rd week of the month. Is it possible to get pregnant even if my period came?”

If you have already had your menstrual cycle, and it was normal, then you most likely are not pregnant. There are times when a woman may be pregnant and still have her cycle, but that is not very common. A urine pregnancy test can be taken if you are still concerned.

Now, if you are not trying to get pregnant, you should see your health care provider for information on birth control. Natural family planning, where you time sex around your time of ovulation can be effective but is a bit more complicated than just choosing to have sex around your menstrual cycle.

 

“I’ve missed my period two months in a row. Around the time I was supposed to have my second period, I had some sort of brownish red discharge.  I am sexually active and mostly use the “pull out” method.  I took a pregnancy test a few days after I should have started my second period but it came back negative. I’m not sure what this means or what I should do .. Help!”

You should see a care provider to be evaluated for pregnancy. The “pull out” method is not a reliable method to prevent pregnancy. Your care provider can discuss your options for birth control, provide testing for sexually transmitted infections as well as find out why you have missed periods if you are not pregnant.

Find out how to protect yourself by getting the education you need to make informed choices about your health.

We hope this helps!

“I had sex with my girlfriend one day using a condom and the day after without a condom. I ejaculated inside of her, so is there a chance she could be pregnant?”

Yes, there is a chance she could get pregnant. Each year, in the United States, about 3.5 million women have an ‘unintended’ pregnancy. This means that she was not planning on getting pregnant and either did not use any type of birth control or used birth control incorrectly.

The only sure way to not get pregnant, is to not have sex! That means, if you are having sex and do not want to become pregnant, then you have to use birth control all the time. Condoms are not the most reliable form of birth control but do provide protection against sexually transmitted infections. The two of you should talk about the different birth control options and choose the one that works best for her. If you are not sure of the different types of birth control, make an appointment with a health care provider and discuss all options along with possible side effects.

To help prevent an unintended pregnancy you need to use a condom every single time you have sex. Condoms offer excellent protection against sexually transmitted infections (STI) and again, should be used every single time you have sex, even if the woman is taking birth control.

Remember, you need to use a new condom with each time you have sex too! Most health departments will give free latex condoms and will even give instructions on the proper care and use of condoms.

 

Hope this helps.

“One night about a month ago, my boyfriend and I were drunk and had sex. He didn’t use a condom, and I’m not on any birth control. My period was almost two weeks late. Could I still be pregnant or am I in the clear?”

If you had a normal menstrual period, it is unlikely that you are pregnant. A bigger concern is, were you exposed to a sexually transmitted infection (STI). If you are going to engage in sex, you and your partner need to be tested for STIs and you should consider talking with your health care provider about contraception options. Using condoms will both reduce the risk of an unintended pregnancy and will protect against getting an STI. Most health departments offer free latex condoms and will even give instructions on the proper care and use of condoms.

We hope this helps.

“Can you stop naturally lubricating after The Depo Shot?”

Depo Provera generally does not affect vaginal lubrication but for some women, this might be a side effect. There are water soluble vaginal lubricants that can be purchased over the counter and without a prescription! We reccommend : Astro Glide or KY Jelly.

Vaginal dryness is NOT permanent and once you are off of a hormonal method of birth control – such as : birth control pills, patches, and vaginal rings, as well as Depo Provera – your normal vaginal mucus will return. Be aware that your ability to get pregnant will also return!

Never use an oil-based product, such as Vaseline because it can actually hurt vaginal tissue and cannot be used with condoms.  Additionally, you should avoid products that contain oils or fragrances because they can cause vaginal irritation and increase the chances of getting a vaginal infection, like a yeast infection. Douching is NOT effective for moisturizing and will also increase the risk of infection.

“I don’t trust the guy to know – or care to know – how to put on a condom properly. I tell him that if he doesn’t have the patience to let me put it on for him, then I don’t have time for him at all. In my opinion, his lack of patience determines his lack of consideration for my well being & peace of mind.
How can I make my point to him without making him feel inadequate?”

Part of being in a healthy relationship is being able to communicate. Try talking to him at a time when you are not engaged in sex. Tell him how you feel and discuss the proper way to put on a condom.

Later, when you do have sex, watch him and if you feel that he does know the correct way to put on a condom, both of you will feel more confident.

We hope this helps!

“Can my girlfriend be pregnant if I pulled out before ejaculation?”
Pulling out before ejaculation can help prevent pregnancy, but it’s risky because guys can’t always tell exactly when they’re going to ejaculate. Also, some guys have a small amount of sperm in their pre-cum.

If you and your girlfriend think you might continue to experiment with vaginal sex, she should ask a health care provider about going on an effective form of birth control to avoid unintended pregnancy.

Using birth control AND condoms together is the best way to prevent pregnancy as well as STIs. If you want to keep using the pull out method to avoid pregnancy, you should also use condoms in case there’s sperm in your pre cum or you don’t pull out in time.

 

We hope this helps!

“I really want to talk to my parents about birth control, but I’m so nervous about it. What should I do?”

High five for including your parents in this conversation and for thinking ahead! Talking about birth control may seem scary, but parents often end up being relieved that you started the conversation. Using birth control is mature and responsible and so is talking with your parents about it.

Here are some thoughts on how to talk to parents about birth control. While sharing with your parents is encouraged, it’s okay if you want to keep some stuff private. They may ask you if you’re having sex and you should be honest with them if you can. It’s their job to help you stay safe and happy, which is why they want to know details about your life.  But if you feel like you can’t tell your parents you’re having sex, you can say, “I want to go on birth control, just to be safe.” You could also talk about the other benefits of birth control. Some forms of birth control help with things like lighter periods or clearing up acne.

If your parents get upset, tell them that you know they care about you and you trust their advice, so that’s why you came to them. You can also admit that this isn’t the easiest talk to have. Remind them that protecting yourself against STDs and pregnancy is really important, and you want their support.

And don’t forget: If you’re under 18, you can things like free condoms, pregnancy/HIV tests and free birth control at a MS Health Department Clinic.

“I am on The Depo Shot and the last time I had my period it lasted for 39 days. I was very worried and called my doctor but she said that was normal. Now it’s been two months since my period and I have had sex with my boyfriend using the pullout method. Should I take a pregnancy test to be sure?”

Once you begin Depo Provera for contraception, your periods may be early or late, shorter or longer, or heavier or lighter than normal. You may also have some spotting between periods, especially during the first several months of use.

Over time, your periods may stop completely, and this is normal. As long as you are getting your injections every 3 months, you should continue to be protected against pregnancy.

When you stop getting the Depo Provera shots, your periods will usually return within a year, but you are not protected against pregnancy.

If you have missed an injection, or if more than 13 weeks pass between injections and you think you may be pregnant, see your doctor.

Just a reminder, Depo Provera does not provide protection against sexually transmitted infections so latex condoms should be used.

 

“Can you get pregnant while on The Depo Shot?”

Although it is uncommon, there is a small chance. For 100 women that use the Depo Provera Shots, about 10 will experience an unintended pregnancy. Therefore, it is really important to get the shots on time. Depo Provera shots are every 3 months.

Remember: the Depo Provera shot does not protect against sexually transmitted infections so use a latex condom for added protection against pregnancy and infection.

 

We hope this helps!

“What do I do if the condom slipped off inside me after my boyfriend ejaculated? I’m worried I may be pregnant.”

This is why it’s so important to hold on to the base of the condom when pulling the penis out. If a condom slips off inside your vagina, semen CAN spill out and cause pregnancy.

Any time a condom slips off or tears after ejaculation, the best way to prevent pregnancy is to take emergency contraception (if you are not currently on another form of birth control). You can use emergency contraception up to five days after unprotected sex. Plan B One-Step is a type of Morning After Pill that is available over-the-counter (without a prescription) at drugstores, no matter how old you are. Other types of emergency contraception require a visit to a healthcare provider.

If you’re sexually active, think about getting on a long term form of birth control to protect against unplanned pregnancy.

 

“Dear Experts: ’”I took the Depo shot last month for the first time and up until just recently, I’ve had all the awful side effects: cramping, mood swings, headaches, everything. Is it just because it was my first time getting the shot or will this happen all over again after the next injection?”

Depo Provera is a very effective form of birth control when used correctly but many women report side effects such as irregular bleeding, mood swings, cramping, and weight gain. When counseling women on this form of birth control, it should be stressed that the side effects may take 6-12 months to resolve.

The Depo Provera shot works by releasing a hormone-progestin-that prevents the release of an egg each month. Progestin also causes the cervical mucus to become thicker to prevent sperm from entering the uterus. Lastly, with no egg production, the lining of the uterus does not get thick every month and over time, women who choose Depo Provera will stop having a monthly menstrual period.
These side effects are normal but can be frustrating to women.

Side effects that are not normal are:

  • a new lump in your breast;
  • major depression;
  • migraine with aura — seeing bright, flashing zigzags, usually before a very bad headache;
  • pus, pain for many days, or bleeding where you were given the shot;
  • unusually heavy or prolonged vaginal bleeding;
  • yellowing of the skin or eyes.

Talk to your provider about any side effects that you are experiencing. Hope this helps!

-FNF Experts

 

Spermicides are safe to use with condoms and will provide added protection from an unintended pregnancy. Yes, you can use flavored condoms. Always remember, latex condoms will protect against sexually transmitted infections, so read the label carefully and always check the expiration date on the condom.

Hope this helps!

– FNF Experts

 

It wouldn’t hurt, and here’s why.

You already know that using a condom every time you have sex is a good idea. Condoms don’t just help prevent pregnancy — they also help protect you from STDs, which the pill doesn’t do.

So why add the pill or another kind of birth control into the mix? For one thing, using the pill and a condom together means you’re super protected against pregnancy. A lot of people like using condoms and other birth control together because it helps them relax and not worry about accidentally causing a pregnancy or transmitting STDs.

 

Wondering what the success rate for the pullout method is? It’s not so great.

With typical use (meaning you don’t use it perfectly), 27% of women will become pregnant in one year. With perfect use, 4% of women will become pregnant in one year.

Also, this method doesn’t protect you against STDs or HIV.

 

If you’re a Mississippi teen under 18, you can get things like condoms, birth control, pregnancy tests or HIV tests at any Mississippi Dept. of Health Clinic WITHOUT telling your parents. And for FREE.

Find a clinic near you: https://factnotfictionms.com/clinics

 

“Dear Experts: I’m 18 and started having vaginal dryness after Depo. It’s embarrassing but I want to know if it can be cured permanently? And what medicines can help it?”

Because of the hormonal changes that occur while using Depo-Provera, some women do experience vaginal dryness.  If you are happy with Depo as your birth control method (and remember, it is a highly effective method with very little chance of getting pregnant while using it), you do not need to stop using it because of the vaginal dryness you are experiencing.

Rest assured, the dryness is NOT permanent and there are many over-the-counter (meaning, they can be bought without a prescription) products that can help deal with this minor side effect. Several non-hormonal water-based preparations are available (e.g., K-Y Personal Lubricant, Astroglide, Lubrin, Moist Again) and can be used daily to provide comfort for vaginal dryness and during sexual activity.  Longer-acting vaginal moisturizers (e.g., Replens, K-Y Long-Lasting Vaginal Moisturizer) may be more appealing for some women, since you do not need to use them daily.

One note of caution, you should not use any oil-based products, such as petroleum jelly (e.g., Vaseline) as these preparations can hurt vaginal tissue and are not easily removed.  Other products that contain oils or fragrances should not be used for vaginal dryness because they actually can cause vaginal irritation and make an environment where it’s easier to get a vaginal infection, because they change the normal balance that the vagina needs to stay healthy. Douching is NOT effective for moisturizing and will also increase the risk of infection.

Once you are off of a hormonal method of birth control (that includes birth control pills, patches, and vaginal rings, as well as Depo Provera), your normal vaginal mucus (discharge) will return and you will be “cured” of your vaginal dryness – but your ability to get pregnant will also return!  All birth control methods have side effects to deal with (some big and some small), it’s just figuring out what changes can be made to deal with them.  In this case, I think any of the products mentioned above should help deal with the side effect you are experiencing and make you comfortable once again.

Hope this helps!

-FNF Experts

 

Yes, it is normal to miss your period; however that does not mean there is no cause for worry. Menses is controlled by hormones that keep the body balanced. Missed periods may mean a disruption of that balance. Medically, the absence of a period can be placed in two categories, amenorrhea or oligomenorrhea.

Amenorrhea is the absence of one or more periods. Amenorrhea is diagnosed when a female has started her regular periods, but missed three periods in a row or when a female has not had a period by age 16. Oligomenorrhea is diagnosed when someone has started their regular periods, but the periods then become infrequent or the flow significantly decreases. Oligomenorrhea may be the symptom of a bigger underlying cause such as mumps, thyroid problems, or anorexia. Other less severe causes of missed periods include stopping birth control like Depo Provera, obesity, stress, or strenuous exercise.

You should see a healthcare provider for any missed periods to assess all possible reasons for your missed periods. I know you said you weren’t sexually active or on any birth control at this time, but have you ever? It only takes one time to become pregnant. Pregnancy is the most common reason for amenorrhea. You really should visit your health care provider to discuss this matter because pregnancy is not the only consequence of sex, you can also get a sexually transmitted disease. If you are not sexually active, I applaud you and strongly encourage you to remain so. Abstinence is the best option to ensure continued sexual health.

Hope this helps!

-FNF Experts

“I think that maybe you already know the right answer for you and are writing for some support for that answer. Let’s look at reality. The bottom line of what you said is, “I’m not ready for a child.” I would also have that same conversation with your boyfriend. Is he ready to support a child and commit to a forever relationship with you as a parent? If the answer for both of you is no, then why take any chance at all for that to happen? Every type of birth control has what are called failure rates. In other words, even when used perfectly, sometimes they don’t work perfectly and a woman becomes pregnant. The only 100% effective method is abstinence – not having sex. But, there are at least a thousand ways to show your love for someone without having sex…..

If you do decide to have sex, however, it is very, very important that you see a health care provider before that happens – to discuss the different birth control methods available, what the pros and cons are for each method, risks of getting STIs (sexually transmitted infections – like gonorrhea [GC], chlamydia, herpes, and HIV), and how to use the birth control method correctly, so that it works the best it can. A highly effective birth control method needs to be completely on board before the first episode of sex. Condoms by themselves have about a 15% failure rate for preventing pregnancy within a year of use in what is called “typical use” (the numbers for people that actually use them, not what perfect use numbers are.) So, while condoms can and do help prevent pregnancy and STIs, if you want the lowest risk possible for either of those possibilities, it would good to find out if there is a method you can use that has a better “typical user” rate of effectiveness.
Think, listen to your heart, talk to an older woman whom you trust, is wise, and cares for you…. With any big decision in life (and you will face many), it’s worth taking the time to make the choice that is best overall for you – the one that helps you achieve the dreams and goals you have for your future. You won’t have any regrets later if you go with that!“

STIs

“Can you get an STI if you and your partner are both virgins?”

If two people who don’t have STIs have sex, then it’s not possible for either of them to get one.

However, just because someone says they’re a virgin doesn’t necessarily mean they don’t have an STI. STIs are not just passed through genital-to-genital contact. Unprotected oral sex can also lead to STIs. So if one of you has had oral sex without using a condom, dental dam, or other barrier, there is a chance you could be at risk.

The best way to stay protected is to use a condom. Condoms are the only way to protect yourself from STIs when you have vaginal or anal sex. Using other barriers (like a dental dam) can help oral sex be safer as well.

Want to be totally sure you’re both STI free? Get tested regularly.

We hope this helps.

 

You can only get pregnant if semen gets inside the vagina. Since the anus isn’t connected to reproductive organs, anal sex can’t directly cause pregnancy. But it’s still possible for semen to get into the vagina during anal sex. It can happen if the guy ejaculates into or near the anus, and the semen leaks from there down onto the vulva. Semen on hands or fingers could also put it closer to the vulva, also.

Wearing a condom during anal sex can reduce your risk. And don’t forget: Anal sex is also a high-risk behavior for spreading many STIs.

Hope this helps.

Relationships

“My boyfriend and I were messing around and ended up grinding against each other in our underwear. Could pre-cum get through the fabric and get me pregnant? I’m a virgin and slightly paranoid about pregnancy.“

To answer your question, you are not likely to get pregnant from the activities that you are describing. The more important conversation is how old are you and your boyfriend and have you talked about using birth control. I want to encourage you to make an appointment with a health care provider who can give you information on birth control and can also provide information on protection from sexually transmitted infections.

“I was giving my boyfriend a hand job and this watery stuff seeped out of his penis every now and then. Apparently it got on my arm and he thought it was spit, so he wiped it off. After that he started fingering me. I googled whether I could get pregnant from this since his hands may have touched it, but I can’t get a straight answer. What do you guys say?“

It is highly unlikely that you will become pregnant from the situation you describe. However, you should see a health care provider to discuss birth control options to prevent an unintended pregnancy.

 

We hope this helps!

“My boyfriend and I (we are both guys) have been tested and are clean. We’re both comfortable having sex without a condom. Are there any risks still involved?“

If you are certain that you are in a monogamous relationship
(meaning neither you or your partner are having sex with someone else) then you
would not be exposed to a sexually transmitted infection.

Hope this helps.

“My partner always asks me when we’re going to have sex. I’m not ready, but sometimes I wonder if it will make us closer. Is it wrong to think this?”

Having sex can bring people closer or it can push people apart, especially if one of them isn’t into it. It sounds like you know how you feel about sex  — you’re not ready yet. That’s what matters. You’re the only person who can make that decision.

Sex is an important way for lots of couples to feel close to one another. But one of the biggest ground rules of sex is that both partners should want to do it. Deciding to have sex is a big deal, and rushing into it could make you feel like you’re sacrificing your wants and values  — and that’s not going to make your relationship any stronger or closer. In fact, it can make it worse.

Talk about your feelings with your partner so you can be clear about what you want. If your partner doesn’t respect what you think and want, or if they keep pressuring you to have sex, then it’s probably time to think about whether this relationship is right for you.

Always remember this: Anyone who truly cares about you will respect your decision.

Hope this helps.

 

Although some may disagree with me, the difference in making love and having sex is emotion. Making love is an act shared by two people who have an emotional attachment and commitment to each other. When you love someone, all of the emotions tied to love: respect, caring, gentleness, kindness ( and so many more) are shared during sex.

Having sex is more like “hooking up” where sexual tension and pleasure are just that, a release. It is not to say that couples may not care about each other, in casual sex, they have not reached that deeper commitment that goes with loving someone.

Hope this helps!

 

“Dear Experts: When I have sex with my boyfriend I like it, but when it wants it again the next day or so, I don’t really care to give it to him. I’ve felt this way in other relationships also. Is something wrong with me?”

No, there is nothing wrong with you. It is common for a man’s sexual drive, especially that of a young man, to want to have sex more frequently than a woman does. A woman is simply wired differently in how her hormones work and, a lot of times, in what sex means to her.

What I care about more is this – maybe there are things you want to be involved with more than just having sex? When a young woman’s energy is focused a lot on a boyfriend, many things that are important to making a great life for the future get pushed aside. There are things that matter more to me about you than your boyfriend wanting to have sex a lot. Things like – 1) With sex, comes the chance of getting pregnant or becoming infected with a sexually transmitted disease (an STD). A baby is a forever life change and some STDs don’t ever go away – like herpes and HIV. 2) With sex, the energy you have for other areas of your life can get used up. Everyone has a dream for what they want to do, who they want to be. Finding your dream and making it happen takes time and effort. Is the risk of pregnancy and STDs worth what it can do to your dream? 3) With sex, you become emotionally tight with that person. Is he a person worthy of that bond? If he is, make sure he is showing you that in other ways – like having a dream for himself, working hard in school or at his job, and showing you commitment and respect. If he can’t do those things, it’s not worth having sex with him – any day.

Hope this helps.

-FNF Experts

 

Well, there is a lot of missing information here! How old are you and your boyfriend? Is this a committed long term relationship? Are you financially able to support an unintended pregnancy? But more importantly, why do you want to become sexually active? From your question, you are not ready for the responsibilities that accompany sexual relations. Let’s look at reality. The bottom line of what you said is, “I’m not ready for a child.” and you are concerned about STDs. Does your boyfriend feel the same way? Is he ready to support a child and commit to a forever relationship with you as a parent?
This is a very important conversation that you and your boyfriend need to have.

If both of you answer no, then why take any chance at all for that to happen? Every type of birth control has what are called failure rates. In other words, even when used perfectly, sometimes they don’t work perfectly and a woman becomes pregnant. The only 100% effective method is abstinence – not having sex. But, there are at least a thousand ways to show your love for someone without having sex…..

If you do decide to have sex it is very, very important that you (and your boyfriend) see a health care provider before that happens – to discuss the different birth control methods available, what the pros and cons are for each method, risks of getting STIs (sexually transmitted infections – like gonorrhea, chlamydia, herpes, and HIV), and how to use the birth control method correctly, so that it works the best it can. A highly effective birth control method needs to be completely on board before the first episode of sex. Condoms by themselves have about a 15% failure rate for preventing pregnancy within a year of use in what is called “typical use” (the numbers for people that actually use them, not what perfect use numbers are.) So, while condoms can and do help prevent pregnancy and STIs, if you want the lowest risk possible for either of those possibilities, it would good to find out if there is a method you can use that has a better “typical user” rate of effectiveness.

Before you make this decision, ask yourself what are your life’s dreams and goals. Are these goals shared by your boyfriend? Then, listen to your heart. If often helps to talk to an older woman whom you trust, is wise, and cares for you…. Even though our culture often glosses sex, this is a huge decision and it’s worth taking the time to make the choice that is best overall for you – the one that helps you achieve the dreams and goals you have for your future. You won’t have any regrets later if you go with that!

Hope this helps!

-FNF Experts

“I think that maybe you already know the right answer for you and are writing for some support for that answer. Let’s look at reality. The bottom line of what you said is, “I’m not ready for a child.” I would also have that same conversation with your boyfriend. Is he ready to support a child and commit to a forever relationship with you as a parent? If the answer for both of you is no, then why take any chance at all for that to happen? Every type of birth control has what are called failure rates. In other words, even when used perfectly, sometimes they don’t work perfectly and a woman becomes pregnant. The only 100% effective method is abstinence – not having sex. But, there are at least a thousand ways to show your love for someone without having sex…..

If you do decide to have sex, however, it is very, very important that you see a health care provider before that happens – to discuss the different birth control methods available, what the pros and cons are for each method, risks of getting STIs (sexually transmitted infections – like gonorrhea [GC], chlamydia, herpes, and HIV), and how to use the birth control method correctly, so that it works the best it can. A highly effective birth control method needs to be completely on board before the first episode of sex. Condoms by themselves have about a 15% failure rate for preventing pregnancy within a year of use in what is called “typical use” (the numbers for people that actually use them, not what perfect use numbers are.) So, while condoms can and do help prevent pregnancy and STIs, if you want the lowest risk possible for either of those possibilities, it would good to find out if there is a method you can use that has a better “typical user” rate of effectiveness.
Think, listen to your heart, talk to an older woman whom you trust, is wise, and cares for you…. With any big decision in life (and you will face many), it’s worth taking the time to make the choice that is best overall for you – the one that helps you achieve the dreams and goals you have for your future. You won’t have any regrets later if you go with that!“

Pregnancy

“My boyfriend and I were messing around and ended up grinding against each other in our underwear. Could pre-cum get through the fabric and get me pregnant? I’m a virgin and slightly paranoid about pregnancy.“

To answer your question, you are not likely to get pregnant from the activities that you are describing. The more important conversation is how old are you and your boyfriend and have you talked about using birth control. I want to encourage you to make an appointment with a health care provider who can give you information on birth control and can also provide information on protection from sexually transmitted infections.

“I was giving my boyfriend a hand job and this watery stuff seeped out of his penis every now and then. Apparently it got on my arm and he thought it was spit, so he wiped it off. After that he started fingering me. I googled whether I could get pregnant from this since his hands may have touched it, but I can’t get a straight answer. What do you guys say?“

It is highly unlikely that you will become pregnant from the situation you describe. However, you should see a health care provider to discuss birth control options to prevent an unintended pregnancy.

 

We hope this helps!

“Is it possible to “flush out” sperm after you have sex to help prevent pregnancy?”

It may seem like using the bathroom or washing down there after sex may “flush out” sperm and reduce your chance of pregnancy, but that’s not the case.

Your urethra and vagina are two different holes. Peeing after sex won’t rinse sperm out of the vagina, because you don’t pee out of your vagina.

When someone ejaculates, they release millions and millions of sperm, and it only takes one to cause a pregnancy. If there’s already an egg in the fallopian tubes, sperm may fertilize it. If not, sperm hang out for up to six days waiting for an egg. There’s really nothing you can do to get every sperm out of your vagina and other reproductive organs once ejaculate is in there. Washing, peeing, douching or using spermicide after unprotected sex won’t help prevent pregnancy.

The only thing that can prevent pregnancy after unprotected sex is emergency contraception. You can take EC up to five days after unprotected sex. If you’re having vaginal sex you should use a birth control method to help prevent pregnancy along with condoms to help prevent STIs.

“I have a friend who isn’t on any birth control. She and her boyfriend have recently been having a lot of unprotected sex. She recently has been having a lot of trouble eating things such as bread and milk because they give her an upset stomach. Can an early pregnancy cause symptoms like that?“

Early pregnancy can indeed cause a change in women’s diet. Some women find foods intolerable, may crave other foods, or may experience nausea / vomiting. Encourage your friend to see her health care provider.

 

We hope this helps!

“If you get cum or pre-cum on your hands, will washing and drying them guarantee that you get all of it off?”

The simple answer is, yes! If you wash your hands it will come off.

 

We hope this helps1

“I haven’t had my period for 2 months and I am sexually active.  I recently had a colposcopy and have taken many home pregnancy tests which all came up negative. I’ve been having hot flashes and stomach pains, but the doctor said that I am healthy. What do you think?“

We’re not sure how old you are, but we’ll tell you what we know! For older women, those symptoms (irregular periods and hot flashes) may be the beginning of menopause. We call this the perimenopausal period, which can last up to about ten years. If you have seen a practitioner, but are continuing to have symptoms that are painful, you might want to seek a second opinion.

We hope this helps.

“I had sex and the condom broke so I took Plan B twenty minutes later. Would it be dumb for me to consume alcohol on the same night?”

Combining alcohol with any medication is highly unadvisable.

“I took the Depo shot four weeks ago and have been experiencing vaginal dryness and pain during sex.  In the first week,  I was getting headaches but they disappeared – does that mean the pain will disappear as well? If not, is there anything I can do to stop it??

The pain you are having with sex may be because of the vaginal dryness. There are several lubricants on the market that can be used, such as KY or Astro-glide. These are water soluble and can be used with Latex condoms. Remember, products made with petroleum jelly, such as Vaseline, should never be used as a lubricant. If the extra lubrication does not relieve the painful sex, you should see a care provider.

We hope this helps!

“I’m 17, engaged, and would like to start my own family. Are there any family planning programs out there for teens like me?”

Today, most all health care providers offer preconception care. These appointments are look at the overall health of women and try to correct any health problems before she gets pregnant. For example, if she is underweight or overweight, diet counseling might begin to help her get to her best weight before getting
pregnant.

You don’t say how old your fiancé is or if you are in a financial position to begin a family but these factors need to be considered also. Parenthood can be joyful but is not without stress. Teen parents need a strong support system to help them be successful in those early years.

We hope this helps.

“Can you get an STI if you and your partner are both virgins?”

If two people who don’t have STIs have sex, then it’s not possible for either of them to get one.

However, just because someone says they’re a virgin doesn’t necessarily mean they don’t have an STI. STIs are not just passed through genital-to-genital contact. Unprotected oral sex can also lead to STIs. So if one of you has had oral sex without using a condom, dental dam, or other barrier, there is a chance you could be at risk.

The best way to stay protected is to use a condom. Condoms are the only way to protect yourself from STIs when you have vaginal or anal sex. Using other barriers (like a dental dam) can help oral sex be safer as well.

Want to be totally sure you’re both STI free? Get tested regularly.

We hope this helps.

“Two days ago my boyfriend and I had unprotected sex. It was
my first time and I was too afraid to ask about protection. I thought he should
know what he was doing. He never pulled out BUT he told me it wasn’t far enough
in and that I shouldn’t worry. Also, he said I should take a bath. I’m not sure
that does anything. I insisted he get tested for any STIs prior to any
encounter, so I suppose I’m good in that area. I’m extremely concerned about
pregnancy. How soon can I take a test?”

If you are old enough to engage in sex, you are old enough to insist on using protection! Your
partner knows less about sex than you and his advice was all wrong.

Please make an appointment with you care provider so that you can get the information you
need to be safe not only from an STI but also from an unintended pregnancy.
Encourage your partner to go with you or to make an appointment with his care provider. Knowledge is power!

We hope this helps!

“Can stress mess up my period?”

Yes, stress can affect your hormones and that can change your menstrual cycle. Other things can delay your period, too, like being sick, exercising a lot, taking medications, etc. It’s also normal for your period to
be irregular every once in a while.

We hope this helps!

“How effective is preventing pregnancy if you take the pill every day at the same time and he wears a condom?”

Using the birth control pill with a condom is very
effective at preventing an unintended pregnancy. Nothing is 100% effective
except for abstinence.

We hope this helps!

“How do you know what days you can easily get pregnant on?”

A woman is fertile 3 days before she ovulates and 3 days after ovulation. If her periods are
regular, a care provider can help determine when she is ovulating and can also
provide information for a healthy pregnancy or can provide information on
preventing an unintended pregnancy.

 

“What are the chances of becoming pregnant 3 days after ovulation?”

The chances of becoming pregnant 3 days after ovulation are pretty high! Generally, 3 days before ovulation and 3 days after ovulation are the most fertile. Unless you are intending to become pregnant, using contraception, such as Nexplanon, IUD or birth control pills, will offer excellent protection against an unintended pregnancy. In most states, beginning at age 13, women can seek contraception without parental permission. Latex condoms should be used with any birth control to protect against STD infections. Your health care provider will provide you with much more information on birth control options and STD protection.

 

“My boyfriend and I had sex but I’m on birth control. They say if you have sex on the week your fertility is high you could get pregnant. Is that true?”

If you are using a birth control method correctly, your chances of becoming pregnant are pretty
small. For women not using a reliable method of birth control, she is more likely to become pregnant if she has sex during the time that she is ovulating.

 

“I’ve been on birth control for as long as I can remember, and now that I’m finally off, my significant other and I are trying to get pregnant. How should I plan this? What’s the best way to find out if I’m even fertile anymore?”

Once a woman stops her birth control, it may take up to a year to become pregnant. If you have just begun trying to get pregnant, then be patient. There are several ways to estimate when you are ovulating so see your care provider for a physical exam and begin taking a good multivitamin with folic acid.

 

Hope this helps!

 

“Can sperm still affect a girl if it was through anal?”

Anal intercourse will not result in pregnancy but can result in exposure to a sexually transmitted infection. Also, couples having anal sex should remember to use a different condom if they have vaginal sex or to have the male wash his penis before entering the vagina to prevent the woman from getting a vaginal infection.

 

Hope this helps.

“If I’m on the pill, and my boyfriend and I are STD / HIV free, can we have sex without a condom? Or would the pullout method be alright?”

The birth control pill will protect against an unintended pregnancy if taken as directed while latex condoms offer protection against STIs. If you are certain that you are in a monogamous relationship (meaning neither you or your partner are having sex with someone else) then you would not be exposed to a sexually transmitted infection.

Condoms offer added protection against pregnancy so if you are not great at remembering to take your pills, you may want to continue using a condom. Withdrawal, or the pull out method is not very reliable!

 

Hope this helps.

 

“Dear Experts, My period is always really erratic and I took the morning after pill. How can I tell if I missed my period and am pregnant – or if it’s because of the pill?”

After taking emergency contraception it’s normal for your period to be a little later or earlier than usual. EC is pretty good at preventing pregnancy if you take it within five days of unprotected sex, so it’s unlikely you’re pregnant. But you can find out for sure by taking a pregnancy test three weeks after when you took the pill.

Want to have a more regular period and not worry about having to take emergency contraception? Some birth control methods work really well at preventing pregnancy and also help regulate your period.

Hope this helps.

“A year ago I was put on depo but only went for two shots. I went 6 months without a shot and finally started bleeding again. Since I was sexually active again I went the week after my period to get my shots renewed. I got the shot and had unprotected sex a month after. I started bleeding but I thought it was just because I wasn’t used to it anymore. I stopped bleeding for a week and now I have been bleeding for a month straight. I also have a moving sensation in my stomach.. Please help!”

A major side effect of Depo Provera is irregular bleeding. You need to see your health care provider for a pregnancy test and pending results, your provider can provide the needed care.
Make an appointment by finding a clinic near you: www.factnotfiction.com/clinic-finder

 

“My boyfriend and I had sex a few weeks ago, maybe almost a month ago, and this morning I can hardly stand without feeling nauseous. It’s different than the flu or even other stomach sicknesses. Could it be morning sickness or is it too early?”

Everyone reacts to pregnancy differently so getting a pregnancy test will tell you if you are pregnant. If the test is positive, seek early prenatal care. You and your practitioner can discuss your pregnancy at that visit.

If the test is negative, you need to consider contraception if you are not wanting to become pregnant. Again, your health care provider can discuss all options that are available and help you choose birth control that works best for you.

Hope this helps.

“I have the dermal birth control implant and I have had it for one year. I recently had sex and he pulled out.  I took four tests: 1st was negative, 2nd was negative until five hours later, 3rd and 4th were negative. Could I be pregnant? Do I need to take another test in a few days?”

The birth control implant provides protection from pregnancy for 3 years. Since you have had your implant for a year, you should be protected from pregnancy. It sounds like the second pregnancy test was a false-positive.

Remember, the implant does not protect against a sexually transmitted infection so latex condoms should be used if you are ever unsure about your partner.

 

Hope this helps.

“My partner used to smoke a lot of marijuana and has now fully quit. I know you can get STDs from sharing and because of that, I’m kind of scared to have any intercourse with him. I asked him if he’d be willing to get checked out but he refused because he claims he has nothing. How can I make sure he really doesn’t have an STD?”

The only way someone can be reassured that they, or their partner, do not have a sexually transmitted infection (STI) is to be tested. If he refuses to be tested, you should not have sex with him. Remember, you can get a STI from oral, anal, and vaginal sex.

 

Hope this helps.

 

“My boyfriend and I had unprotected sex and he didn’t pull out. This was yesterday and my stomach has been hurting a lot since I woke up this morning. Could I possibly be pregnant or could it just be from the sex or neither?”

It is unlikely that you would be feeling any affects from this unprotected sexual encounter. However, if this is not the first time that you had unprotected sex, you might have gotten pregnant or contacted a sexually transmitted infection from having a previous unprotected sexual encounter.

Please go see your health care provider to be certain that you are not pregnant, get tested for STIs and talk about birth control options.

Hope this helps.

“I have been told that I have a high chance of being infertile due to my eating disorder. My partner and I have being having unprotected sex (neither of us have any STDs) since December, and I was just wondering if there is any chance I could still get pregnant?”

Without more information about your medical condition, it is difficult to answer your question. For women with either anorexia or bulimia, chances of becoming pregnant may be decreased but there is still the possibility.

Risks to the mother from anorexia and bulimia include: Poor nutrition, dehydration, cardiac irregularities, gestational diabetes, severe depression during pregnancy, premature births, labor complications, difficulties nursing, post-partum depression.

Additionally, there are risks to a developing baby. They are : poor development, premature birth, low birth weight for age, respiratory distress, feeding difficulties, and other perinatal complications.

You need to be honest with yourself and your health care provider about your struggles with eating. If you are still having difficulties, birth control should be considered until you are able to manage your eating disorder.

We got this information from the NEDA website : https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/pregnancy-and-eating-disorders

 

You can only get pregnant if semen gets inside the vagina. Since the anus isn’t connected to reproductive organs, anal sex can’t directly cause pregnancy. But it’s still possible for semen to get into the vagina during anal sex. It can happen if the guy ejaculates into or near the anus, and the semen leaks from there down onto the vulva. Semen on hands or fingers could also put it closer to the vulva, also.

Wearing a condom during anal sex can reduce your risk. And don’t forget: Anal sex is also a high-risk behavior for spreading many STIs.

Hope this helps.

 

“Dear Experts: ’”I took the Depo shot last month for the first time and up until just recently, I’ve had all the awful side effects: cramping, mood swings, headaches, everything. Is it just because it was my first time getting the shot or will this happen all over again after the next injection?”

Depo Provera is a very effective form of birth control when used correctly but many women report side effects such as irregular bleeding, mood swings, cramping, and weight gain. When counseling women on this form of birth control, it should be stressed that the side effects may take 6-12 months to resolve.

The Depo Provera shot works by releasing a hormone-progestin-that prevents the release of an egg each month. Progestin also causes the cervical mucus to become thicker to prevent sperm from entering the uterus. Lastly, with no egg production, the lining of the uterus does not get thick every month and over time, women who choose Depo Provera will stop having a monthly menstrual period.
These side effects are normal but can be frustrating to women.

Side effects that are not normal are:

  • a new lump in your breast;
  • major depression;
  • migraine with aura — seeing bright, flashing zigzags, usually before a very bad headache;
  • pus, pain for many days, or bleeding where you were given the shot;
  • unusually heavy or prolonged vaginal bleeding;
  • yellowing of the skin or eyes.

Talk to your provider about any side effects that you are experiencing. Hope this helps!

-FNF Experts

 

Wondering what the success rate for the pullout method is? It’s not so great.

With typical use (meaning you don’t use it perfectly), 27% of women will become pregnant in one year. With perfect use, 4% of women will become pregnant in one year.

Also, this method doesn’t protect you against STDs or HIV.

 

A FNF reader asked how long it takes for a girl to know she’s pregnant.

Well, the accuracy of a pregnancy test is most closely related to the day of ovulation, not of the act of intercourse or insemination that caused the pregnancy. Most of the over-the-counter pregnancy tests can tell if someone is pregnant the week following a missed period. Home pregnancy tests are different and come with instructions that must be followed closely for the most accurate results. After testing, you can confirm results by seeing your doc.

If you need to find a doc, we can help: https://factnotfictionms.com/clinics

 

If you are dry humping fully dressed, then no. If you are dry humping without clothes and the penis is near the vagina, even without penetration, ejaculated cum that enters the vagina has the potential to result in an unplanned pregnancy or a sexually transmitted infection.

Hope this helps!

-FNF Experts

 

“Dear Experts: When I have sex with my boyfriend I like it, but when it wants it again the next day or so, I don’t really care to give it to him. I’ve felt this way in other relationships also. Is something wrong with me?”

No, there is nothing wrong with you. It is common for a man’s sexual drive, especially that of a young man, to want to have sex more frequently than a woman does. A woman is simply wired differently in how her hormones work and, a lot of times, in what sex means to her.

What I care about more is this – maybe there are things you want to be involved with more than just having sex? When a young woman’s energy is focused a lot on a boyfriend, many things that are important to making a great life for the future get pushed aside. There are things that matter more to me about you than your boyfriend wanting to have sex a lot. Things like – 1) With sex, comes the chance of getting pregnant or becoming infected with a sexually transmitted disease (an STD). A baby is a forever life change and some STDs don’t ever go away – like herpes and HIV. 2) With sex, the energy you have for other areas of your life can get used up. Everyone has a dream for what they want to do, who they want to be. Finding your dream and making it happen takes time and effort. Is the risk of pregnancy and STDs worth what it can do to your dream? 3) With sex, you become emotionally tight with that person. Is he a person worthy of that bond? If he is, make sure he is showing you that in other ways – like having a dream for himself, working hard in school or at his job, and showing you commitment and respect. If he can’t do those things, it’s not worth having sex with him – any day.

Hope this helps.

-FNF Experts

 

Well, there is a lot of missing information here! How old are you and your boyfriend? Is this a committed long term relationship? Are you financially able to support an unintended pregnancy? But more importantly, why do you want to become sexually active? From your question, you are not ready for the responsibilities that accompany sexual relations. Let’s look at reality. The bottom line of what you said is, “I’m not ready for a child.” and you are concerned about STDs. Does your boyfriend feel the same way? Is he ready to support a child and commit to a forever relationship with you as a parent?
This is a very important conversation that you and your boyfriend need to have.

If both of you answer no, then why take any chance at all for that to happen? Every type of birth control has what are called failure rates. In other words, even when used perfectly, sometimes they don’t work perfectly and a woman becomes pregnant. The only 100% effective method is abstinence – not having sex. But, there are at least a thousand ways to show your love for someone without having sex…..

If you do decide to have sex it is very, very important that you (and your boyfriend) see a health care provider before that happens – to discuss the different birth control methods available, what the pros and cons are for each method, risks of getting STIs (sexually transmitted infections – like gonorrhea, chlamydia, herpes, and HIV), and how to use the birth control method correctly, so that it works the best it can. A highly effective birth control method needs to be completely on board before the first episode of sex. Condoms by themselves have about a 15% failure rate for preventing pregnancy within a year of use in what is called “typical use” (the numbers for people that actually use them, not what perfect use numbers are.) So, while condoms can and do help prevent pregnancy and STIs, if you want the lowest risk possible for either of those possibilities, it would good to find out if there is a method you can use that has a better “typical user” rate of effectiveness.

Before you make this decision, ask yourself what are your life’s dreams and goals. Are these goals shared by your boyfriend? Then, listen to your heart. If often helps to talk to an older woman whom you trust, is wise, and cares for you…. Even though our culture often glosses sex, this is a huge decision and it’s worth taking the time to make the choice that is best overall for you – the one that helps you achieve the dreams and goals you have for your future. You won’t have any regrets later if you go with that!

Hope this helps!

-FNF Experts

“I think that maybe you already know the right answer for you and are writing for some support for that answer. Let’s look at reality. The bottom line of what you said is, “I’m not ready for a child.” I would also have that same conversation with your boyfriend. Is he ready to support a child and commit to a forever relationship with you as a parent? If the answer for both of you is no, then why take any chance at all for that to happen? Every type of birth control has what are called failure rates. In other words, even when used perfectly, sometimes they don’t work perfectly and a woman becomes pregnant. The only 100% effective method is abstinence – not having sex. But, there are at least a thousand ways to show your love for someone without having sex…..

If you do decide to have sex, however, it is very, very important that you see a health care provider before that happens – to discuss the different birth control methods available, what the pros and cons are for each method, risks of getting STIs (sexually transmitted infections – like gonorrhea [GC], chlamydia, herpes, and HIV), and how to use the birth control method correctly, so that it works the best it can. A highly effective birth control method needs to be completely on board before the first episode of sex. Condoms by themselves have about a 15% failure rate for preventing pregnancy within a year of use in what is called “typical use” (the numbers for people that actually use them, not what perfect use numbers are.) So, while condoms can and do help prevent pregnancy and STIs, if you want the lowest risk possible for either of those possibilities, it would good to find out if there is a method you can use that has a better “typical user” rate of effectiveness.
Think, listen to your heart, talk to an older woman whom you trust, is wise, and cares for you…. With any big decision in life (and you will face many), it’s worth taking the time to make the choice that is best overall for you – the one that helps you achieve the dreams and goals you have for your future. You won’t have any regrets later if you go with that!“

Dear Experts,
Would wearing two condoms during sex decrease my chances of getting HIV?
Petey

Dear Petey,
There is no evidence that wearing two condoms is more effective than wearing one, and in fact, there is some belief that the friction of the two condoms rubbing together can cause them to break, making it easier to get HIV and other STDs if your partner is infected, and have an unplanned pregnancy when the female partner is fertile.

xoxox
The Experts

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The content presented here by representatives of the University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Nursing is intended to be broadly informative. It should not be considered a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment tailored to the needs of a specific individual.

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